Jeremy Corbyn will not 'realistically' win the election, Labour MP tells constituents

Mrs May responded by defending her decision to go back on her initial position over an early vote saying she "had the balls to call an election".

Mrs May was confronted by voters on issues of trust and cuts to welfare under the Conservatives, while Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was pressed over his refusal to say if he would use the UK's nuclear weapons, even in retaliation to an attack.

Perhaps the highlight of Corbyn's Q&A session came when his opposition to the use of nuclear weapons was challenged by audience.

"Set free from the shackles of European Union control, we will be a great, global trading nation once again bringing new jobs and new opportunities for ordinary working families here at home", said May, who backed the "Remain" campaign for last year's referendum on European Union membership.

He pointed to Corbyn's emphasis on class, an issue he said so many "wanted to ignore" as a reason for his confidence in Corbyn's transformation of Labour and United Kingdom politics.

"Realistically no one thinks Theresa May will not be Prime Minister, or that she will not have the majority she needs".

We are entering "get the vote out" territory.

On Friday, YouGov said its model suggested the Conservatives were on course to win 313 seats, 13 seats short of a majority.

The two leaders were being quizzed consecutively and during May's outing the audience zoned in on her U-turns over the calling of the General Election and on social care. It is subtitled: "On June 9th, this man could be Prime Minister".

She continued: "I could have stayed on doing that job for another couple of years and not called an election. Now I'm confident we can get a good deal with the right plan for those negotiations, because I think a good deal is in our interests and in the interests of the rest of the EU", May said in a question and answer session with voters on the BBC. "We have a very big challenge ahead of us and I believe I can play a part in that, as all of my colleagues can".

In another hard moment, she was challenged by a woman who struggled to hold back tears as she described waiting for more than a year for counselling on the state-run National Health Service (NHS).

But she told a nurse who said her salary hasn't changed since 2009: "There isn't a magic money tree that we can shake that suddenly provides for everything that people want".

Mr Corbyn was pressed by the audience over whether he would pursue a coalition deal with the SNP in the event of a hung parliament and the Labour leader insisted there would be "no deals".

  • Jon Douglas