Acer refreshes its Predator Orion PCs with Nvidia's GeForce RTX 20xx GPUs

Have no doubt, this is a major architectural overhaul for Nvidia; the Turing Streaming Multiprocessor (SM) has a brand new design with the ability to perform independent floating point and integer operations. Also sporting the new internals, of course. NVIDIA first debuted this architecture in the workstation grade Quadro RTX 8000, 6000 and 5000 GPU and it is now being brought to consumer grade graphics cards.

Huang described the generational lead from the very capable Pascal architecture to Turing as a "shocking contrast", which certainty cranks the hype machine for the new GeForce graphics. This is also when we expect reviews and further details to go live, but we haven't had this confirmed as of yet. It's not exactly photorealistic, but it's a significant improvement over current rendering techniques.

Using ray tracing, game makers can now properly calculate light as it bounces off various surfaces. This is why it was only really used in 3D animation, such as animated movies, which are slowly rendered on a frame by frame basis over a period of several months. Specifically, they are the: RTX 2070, RTX 2080, and RTX 2080 Ti. For that, you're going to get the Turing GPU with 4352 CUDA cores, and 11GB of GDDR6 on a 352-bit memory bus. A Founders Edition of the card runs at a top speed of 1,800MHz, while the vanilla card hits 1,710MHz. That means it supports up to 8K UHD. The RTX 2080 drops performance to 8 Giga Rays per second, 60T RTX-OPS, and a 8GB frame buffer, and it will start at $699 excluding tax. It revealed the GeForce RTX 2070 ($500 USD), RTX 2080 ($700), and RTX 2080 Ti ($1000), all of which will launch on September 20, 2018.

Nvidia's presentation included live in-game demonstrations of ray tracing in action from Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Metro: Exodus, Assetto Corsa, and Battlefield V.

And if you do this enough times and with enough speed, you could use this technique to draw an entire game with a completely new level of fidelity that wasn't really feasible before.

  • Latoya Cobb