Amazon considering opening 3,000 cashierless Go stores, report says

According to a report, Amazon is considering opening 3,000 of its cashierless stores by 2021.

However, that could all change in the coming months as Amazon is thought to be considering opening thousands of new Go stores over the course of three years.

The first AmazonGo store in downtown Seattle-which opened to the public back in January-reportedly cost over $1 million in hardware alone, says an unnamed source speaking with Bloomberg.

Adding 3,000 convenience stores would make Amazon Go among the biggest chains in U.S. The internet giant is considering plans to have about 10 locations open by the end of this year, about 50 locations in major metro areas in 2019, and then as many as 3,000 by 2021, said the people, who requested anonymity discussing internal plans. Though not giving a timetable or location details, Amazon also has confirmed plans to open Amazon Go outlets in San Francisco and New York City.

Amazon Go threatens traditional convenience store companies like 7-Eleven, as well as chain fast food sandwich and lunch chains like Subway. Once inside, an array of cameras and sensors track shoppers' progress through the store, charging a credit card on file for items the shoppers take off shelves. The convenience store concept, which works with its own app, allows customers to shop without having to wait in checkout lines.

An Amazon representative told Business Insider the company does not comment on "rumours or speculation".

Amazon Go is the most distinctive of all of its physical stores. It would also give Amazon a much expanded footprint of physical stores in the USA, adding to its more than 350 Whole Foods stores.

In late 2016, stories spread that Amazon was planning to build 2,000 grocery stores.

Bloomberg reported Wednesday that Amazon is considering different models as it looks to expand Go, including weighing whether to include a limited selection of groceries, or simply focus on prepared food pickup. Prepared foods also have wider profit margins than groceries, which would help decrease the time it takes for the stores to become profitable.

Essentially using your smartphone as a pass, shoppers must swipe their device at a turnstile in order to enter the store.

  • Anthony Vega