Bill Allowing Post-Shutdown Federal Employee Back Pay Heads To Trump

"If they backfill it immediately after the government opens, that's fine, but I don't want that to be where that money is not available". When Pelosi replied "no", Trump by his admission put his hands up in exasperation and said "bye bye".

On Thursday, the president said he would declare a national emergency to compel funds for the wall if he couldn't make a deal with Democrats.

The House of Representatives approved legislation Friday to fund and reopen the Interior Department, the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies impacted by the partial government shutdown, though the measure is expected to be dead on arrival in the Senate and faces a White House veto threat. "We shouldn't have to", Trump told reporters.

The White House has directed the Army Corps of Engineers to comb through its budget in search of money for the wall, including looking at $13.9 billion in unspent disaster relief funds earmarked for areas including hurricane-damaged Puerto Rico, Texas and more than a dozen other states.

"We can declare a national emergency".

Almost $14 billion in emergency disaster relief funds have been allocated but not yet obligated through contracts for a variety of projects in states including California, Florida and Texas and in the US territory of Puerto Rico that have been ravaged by recent hurricanes, wildfires and other natural disasters, according to the aide familiar with the matter.

Taking the shutdown fight to the Mexican border, President Donald Trump edged closer Thursday to declaring a national emergency in an extraordinary end run around Congress to fund his long-promised border wall.

Trump delivered a prime-time address to the nation on Tuesday night where he warned of a "crisis" at the southern border with Mexico, and on Thursday, he made a visit to the border. Critics have said the move would be an unconstitutional abuse of emergency powers. One said the phone calls coming into his office were overwhelmingly in favor of Trump's border wall.

Senior aide Jared Kushner, who traveled with the president to Texas, is among those urging caution on the declaration, according to a person familiar with Kushner's thinking but not authorized to publicly discuss the issue.

  • Jon Douglas